Hollywood Tech

Walking Internet Avatar Benedict Cumberbatch Reportedly in Talks to Play Alan Turing in Biopic

(Photo: Zap2It)

This should delight the Sherlock fangirls on Tumblr: Benedict Cumberbatch, who’s currently shooting The Fifth Estate, in which he plays controversial Wikileaks founder Julian Assange, is reportedly in talks to take on his next awesomely nerdy role. Deadline reports that Mr. Cumberbatch may be gearing up to play Alan Turing in a biopic about the famous British mathematician’s life. Read More

Program or be Programmed

Pair Programming is Like an ‘Endless Bad Blind Date’

(Photo: Global Nerdy)

If you work at a startup and have ever seen two engineers cozied up next to each other on a beanbag chair intently gazing into the same computer screen, you’ve probably got some pair programmers on your hands. Soon, like a couple who has soured on each other’s affection, they will quibble over the tiniest infractions and eat dinner sullenly, with nothing more to say to each other.

The concept of pair programming–two engineers sharing a computer and working on the same code together–is nothing new, but The Wall Street Journal has discovered the phenomenon and seems simultaneously shocked and awed by how it works. Read More

Silicon Alley U

PC-U: Computer Science Increasingly Popular at NYC Schools

data via the Wall Street Journal

There has been a lot of drama around the new engineering campus that Cornell and Technion will be be building on Roosevelt Island. But in the meantime New York’s exisiting universities have been seeing strong growth in the number of students interested in studying computer science.

Columbia, NYU, Queens College and the Stevens Institute of Technology in Hoboken all reported increases in enrolment for CS classes between 30-50 percent, and a increase in computer sciences majors of 10 and 12 percent at NYU and Columbia. The best part is that students, at least the one quoted in this article, are already beginning to gravitate to New York as a place to study because they see it as a springboard to a startup hub.

“When I was thinking about schools, I wanted to go somewhere that had a start-up ecosystem—in and around cities—but I wanted a place that wasn’t unilaterally focused on technology as an engineering problem,” Arvind Srinivasan, a Columbia sophomore from Fremont, California studying computer science. “New York is really the up-and-coming place because people who don’t have traditional technology backgrounds are starting companies in completely different sectors and utilizing technology.” Read More

Op-Ed

The Difference Between MIT and ITP: Les Savy Fav vs Boston

mit itp

 

This is a guest post from Tarikh Korula, founder of Uncommon Projects, and originally appeared at his blog, unprojects.

I’m often asked what the difference is between NYU’s ITP and MIT’s Media Lab. Sometimes from prospective students, but mostly from high-powered executives or important writers who have heard of the program or The Show. I had one friend once who left Media Lab disappointed, so I’m super-qualified to speak about it.

MIT kids are smart. Really smart. They probably have been studying violin since they were, like, two. Then they wrote software algorithms when they were 10 to approximate a symphony that could play along with them in real time while they played Bach concertos. If these kids were a rock band, they’d be Emerson, Lake and Palmer with a laser show and a 360 major label deal.

ITP kids are… resourceful. We didn’t invent hacking or email or lasers and shit. We invented QTVRPCompGurlArduino and Foursquare. Instead of beautiful John Meada visualizations, we’ve got a lot of wooden tiles that move in concert to show you a picture of yourself and we think that’s art. It’s not really, but we never studied art so we don’t really know any better. If we were a rock band, we’d be the Ramones with their shitty recording contract and Laurie Anderson playing midi controlled tambourine. Read More