startup rundown

Startup News: Kickstarter and IndieGogo Show Off Their Metrics and Middle Schoolers Get Appy

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Kickstarted The crowdfunding king released its annual highlights for 2012 this week. And the startups is going about as gangbusters as well, an oversubscribed, blockbuster Kickstarter campaign. In 2012, 2,241,475 people pledged almost $320 million and successfully funded a little over 18,000 projects. That works out to about $606 per minute. Monetization is so much easier when it’s baked into your platform, isn’t it?

Indie No More Kickstarter competitor Indiegogo also released data for 2012. Campaigns raised 20 percent more in last year than they did in 2011 and successful campaigns took an average of 11 days preparing for their launch. Read More

Seed Stage Slaughter

‘New Tech City’ Won’t Keep You From the Startup Graveyard

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The Center for an Urban Future, a think tank headed by Jonathan Bowles, has released a lengthy report  about New York City’s tech sector, titled “New Tech City.” The Center’s findings indicate amazing growth over the last decade. While “New Tech City” contains mostly good news for the local tech set, there is a dash of cold water–just a bit–to leaven any prospective startup’s bright-eyed optimism.

First, the good news! Read More

Tech Talent Crunch

Study Urges NYC to Train Local Design Schools in New Technologies for the Next Wave of Innovators

Make it work!

Mayor Bloomberg and the New York City Economic Development Corporation may at the top of the list for tech-happiest city governments, but a new study out by the Center for an Urban Future wonders if there’s one sector they’ve been missing: the city’s wealth of design and architecture schools like Parsons The New School for Design, the Fashion Institute of Technology, Pratt Institute and the School of Visual Arts .

The 38-page report, called “Designing New York’s Future,” points out that the number of degrees in design and architecture has grown 40 percent in New York City from 2005 to 2010 and the sector already attracts foreign students (*cough* Technion *cough*). Despite all that, however, design schools have been overlooked as part of the city’s innovation agenda, argues the report: Read More