Legal Matters

Police Must Obtain Warrant Before Searching Your Cell Phone Data, SCOTUS Rules

Chief Justice John Roberts (Wikimedia Commons)

Police must always obtain a warrant to search an arrestee’s cellphone, the Supreme Court ruled today in a unanimous decision.

Today’s cell phones are more than just tools to make calls, the judges recognized. Modern Americans store their entire lives on their phones, from banking information and health data to private conversations and, obviously, sexts. All that stuff deserves constitutional privacy protection, SCOTUS decided. Read More

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Booting Up: 3D Printed Guns Are Coming Edition

(Photo: Instagram, @pinkla16)

Thanksgiving beat out Hurricane Sandy as the most-Instagrammed event ever, solidifying the photo platform as more of a Path-type social network than the future of citizen journalism. [PandoDaily]

The Wiki Weapon Project could be testing its 3D printed guns by end of year. [The Guardian]

Courts continue to wrangle over the legality of collecting texts and data from cell phones to use as evidence. [The New York Times]

Facebook has finally admitted it will soon share the data it collects from your profile with external websites and ad networks. [GigaOm]

Can the Wii U save Nintendo? [The New York Times]