Privacy Police

The NYPD Could Be Reading and Saving Your Call Logs Without a Court Order

(Photo: Getty)

Perhaps it’s time for a burner phone? The New York Times reports that the NYPD has begun quietly and methodically accumulating heaps of call logs and putting them into a searchable database called the Enterprise Case Management System.

It works like this: When someone has their cell phone stolen, the NYPD frequently subpoenas the call logs for that phone, hoping that if the thief used the phone, the recordings will provide evidence that can help track him or her down. But instead of deleting the logs after closing the case, they continue to exist in the NYPD’s database, and could “conceivably be used for any investigative purpose.” Read More

Hack Hack Hack Hack It Apart

Goatse Security’s Andrew Auernheimer Found Guilty Of Charges Related to Massive AT&T Hack

Not teen proof. (Photo: Apple)

Goatse Security hacker Andrew Auernheimer, age 26, has been found guilty on federal charges related to downloading the data of over 100,000 iPad owners from AT&T’s website. Wired reports that the jury that heard Mr. Auernheimer’s trial in a New Jersey federal court only took hours to reach a verdict, finding him guilty of identity fraud and conspiring to access a computer without authorization.

Mr. Auernheimer, using the Twitter handle @rabite, tweeted that he knew “there would be a guilty here” and he will appeal. Read More

Going Mobile

Verizon Waives Two Weeks of Voice and Text Charges for Sandy Victims

(Photo: Twitter/swissmiss)

Anyone in the New York/New Jersey region knows how hard it was to make a call or send a text message in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy’s devastation. Simply dialing up your parents to let them know you were okay resulted in many a frustrating dropped call, “mobile network not available” message or weird busy signal. Not to mention that those who lost power were left without a way to charge their typically omnipresent communication devices. Read More

Where Did I Put My Data?

With Dirt Cheap Data, Can FreedomPop Crack U.S. Smartphone Market?

I can has affordable wireless bill? (Photo: flickr.com/joshsemans)

What’s a girl got to do to get some affordable data service around here? Americans are putting more money than ever towards their smartphone bills, and carriers don’t seem inclined to cut their rates any time soon. But the Wall Street Journal says one company wants to break the stalemate, with dramatically less expensive 4G offerings. The question is whether they can pull it off.

FreedomPop, which launched today, will offer users five gigabytes of data for $35, and one gig for $10. Compare that to the $80 or so six gigs will run you at Verizon, and suddenly you’ve got a lot more money for steak dinners.

There are, however, a couple of bumps in the road to adoption. Read More

Massive Attack! Apple, AT&T, and Sprint Staffers Brace for Siege of iPhone 5 Buyers

(Photo: Instagram/dewalt)

The hordes began lining up along Fifth Avenue eight days ago. Earlier this week, from inside their glass house, Apple store employees in familiar blue shirts (and the occasional derby cap) looked out towards the queue of customers eager to peel open the wrapping on their iPhone 5. But for employees at the flagship location, the yearly event is trading in its pomp for a more perfunctory feel.

Hushed by corporate mandates, Apple employees weren’t forthcoming about the launch. Betabeat approached several staffers the Fifth Avenue and Grand Central locations, but only one would speak to us on background. Sealed lips smiled calmly, despite the intensity of the reality distortion field outside the store. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Tech-Mad Millennials Edition

Good morning, sunshine! (Photo: flickr.com/globochem)

Gen Y just loves working for tech companies. This study cites “flexibility,” which we’re just going to read as “free food.” [CNN Money]

AT&T towers are reportedly screwing with a pricey new police radio system in Oakland, California. [Ars Technica]

Quora assesses Y Combinator’s latest batch of graduates. [Quora]

Speaking of YC: Revenue was all the rage at yesterday’s Demo Day. [Bloomberg]

Shoreham, Long Island is one step closer to having its very own Nikola Tesla Science Center: The Oatmeal-instigated Indiegogo fundraiser to buy the inventor’s last remaining lab surpassed its funding goal late yesterday afternoon. [Indiegogo]

Six percent of the American population lives out of reach of broadband. [Wall Street Journal]

Linkages

Booting Up: Elevators to Space Edition

(Photo: Cosmos Mag)

It costs $35 million to send an HD video via text while roaming on AT&T. Not a bad deal. [Ryan Kearny]

New Yorkers are surprisingly polite on Twitter. [NBC]

“Have you heard that early Groupon investors are bailing on the company? Well, some of them. Maybe less than half. But one of them is a big name, so it must mean the entire Internet sector is screwed.” [Fortune]

Is Google actually considering ditching its current patent system? [CNET]

Going up! Meet the dude who wants to eschew rockets in favor of elevators to space. [BBC]