Linkages

Booting Up: ‘So Snobby We’re Above Snobbery’ Edition

The morning after the first snow. (Photo: Flickr/tomasfano)

The CEO’s of AppNexus and LocalResponse we’re always besties. [PandoDaily]

Alexia Tsotsis breaks down what exactly rubs Valley-ites so wrong about Start-Ups: Silicon Valley: “We’re so snobby we’re above snobbery.” [TechCrunch]

Who convinced President Obama to convene with the forever alones on Reddit? His crack team of data crunchers, of course. [Time]

Even a superstorm can’t break the internet. [AllThingsD]

We didn’t see the Fail Whale once during election night, even as tweets poured by. Twitter VP of infrastructure ops Mazen Rawashdeh credits the company’s stellar performance with its backend overhaul from Ruby to Java. [Twitter Blog]

Meatspace

Citizens of the Internet Gather IRL for a Picnic in Prospect Park

Ms. He's sign

On a mild, sun-dappled Sunday, Betabeat applied our sunscreen and ventured to the Long Meadow in Prospect Park for an event aptly named “The Internet Picnic.” A few weeks ago, a friend of ours named Nicole He had won the Listserve lottery and was tasked with sending an email out to 20,000 random Internet strangers. Ms. He works in community at the crowdsourcing platform Kickstarter. “What should I write??” she frantically gChatted us, before eventually deciding to invite all 21,288 subscribers to a picnic yesterday in Brooklyn.

“I have a mole under my eye and I’ll be wearing red,” she wrote, and then posted the same invitation to her Tumblr, where it received almost 300 notes. Read More

Closing the Gender Gap: A Peek Inside Programs to Train Female Developers

The 20 Girls Who Code participants working out of AppNexus's Flatiron office (Photo: girlswhocode.tumblr.com)

“Maliyah, step away from the mouse!” called Ashley Gavin, a software engineer at the MIT’s Lincoln Laboratory and instructor at the Girls Who Code summer program. Maliyah Greene, the recipient of Ms. Gavin’s reprimand, reluctantly tore herself away from Photoshop to come and talk to Betabeat. We were sitting in AppNexus’s Flatiron office, watching her fellow Girls Who Code students work on virtually tagging brick walls with their names. “It’s not as hard as I thought it would be,” Ms. Greene smiled.

She is one of 20 high school girls who gave up summer vacation to learn about app development, robotics, web design and other topics at Girls Who Code, a summer computer-engineering program for girls.

Though this is its first summer in existence, Girls Who Code already boasts executives from Gilt Groupe, Twitter and General Electric on its board and has been working with AppNexus and other New York startups throughout the summer. Read More

Class Is in Session

Amanda Peyton Fact-Checks the New York Post’s Faulty Tech Coverage

Full-time entrepreneur, part-time factchecker.

In in its Sunday issue, the New York Post put its own spin on data showing that New York City’s tech start-ups racked up $1.7 billion in funding this past year. Using numbers from CB Insights, the paper identified nine “NYC tech giants” based on the amount of funding those start-ups had accrued. But at least one tech scene native was restless over the way the results were reported.

On her Tumblr, MessageParty co-founder Amanda Peyton, who works out of the Makery’s co-working space in Williamsburg, pointed out some of the “half-truths or straight-up errors” in the piece. Her issue wasn’t the numbers, but rather the way the paper described what the companies do. After acknowledging that the tech reporting isn’t exactly in the Post’s wheelhouse, Ms. Peyton added, “But surely someone there should know that Foursquare isn’t an e-commerce company.” Read More