Craigslist Goodies

There’s a Craigslist Black Market for iPhone 6 Line Sitters

Professional line sitters already camped out outside the Apple Store's Fifth Avenue location. (Twitter: Dan Benton)

Craigslist might be home to a ton of creepy job listings, but it can also be a valuable resource for people who vehemently hate waiting in line for stuff.

Take 2013’s cronut craze, for instance. New Yorkers who didn’t have the requisite 7485 hours to wait in line outside Dominique Ansel’s bakery could turn to Craigslist’s cronut black market, wherein people were purchasing the coveted baked goods, and selling them online at up to five times the original price.

With Apple set to unveil big news tomorrow, another such black market has emerged on Craiglist: iPhone 6 line sitters. For the low, low price of hundreds — or thousands, in one case — of dollars, impatient consumers can pay people to wait in line and purchase the newest iPhone for them, when it eventually hits stores at an unknown future date. Read More

Freshly Minted

Why’d Apple Buy Beats and Booklamp? Probably to Build a Massive Subscription Platform

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Welcome to Freshly Minted, where we examine an overlooked deal or funding announcement in tech from the past week and tell you what you need to know and why it matters.

The deal: Apple acquired book analysis startup Booklamp for an alleged $10 to $15 million, likely to begin work building a book subscription platform, or something much bigger.

Apple is always stark and shady when it comes to their acquisitions. They’ve bought a number of under-the-radar startups, and when asked why, they offer up the same response:

“Apple buys smaller technology companies from time to time, and we generally do not discuss our purpose or plans.” Read More

Apples and Androids

Reading Habits Indicate Android Users Are Fun, iPhone Users Are Lifehacking Megalomanics

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In the war between iOS and Android, there are a few things we know: iPhone users are big spenders, live in more affluent neighborhoods and are vastly outnumbered by their Android counterparts. But now, we also intimate knowledge of their reading habits, which shows us more about their personalities than anything we’ve seen so far.

Oyster, the Netflix for books, released a study of their readers this morning, comparing the reading habits of iOS users with the Android users that have signed up since their recent Android release and redesign. Oyster told Betabeat that they pulled from their entire user database for the study. Read More

Life is Tweet

WWDC Was a Snore, But the Live Tweeters Really Turned it Out

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The Internet stood still today in hopes that Apple’s WWDC ’14 would give them the first glimpse of the near future in tech. They were, for the most part, sorely disappointed.

There were no new devices, no cool gadgets, no hotly anticipated iWatch, no new iPhone, no line of sick Macbooks. Sure, they finally debuted Healthbook — renamed “Healthkit” — but we’ve known about that for months. Otherwise, they showed off an iOS upgrade, some cosmetic changes to OSX, and a new programming language called “Swift” that’s sending the code community into a frenzy. Read More

When Lawyers Send Letters

Wage Fixing Scandal: Google, Apple, Intel and Adobe Pay $324 Million In Damages

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After the tech crash of the early 2000’s, major tech CEO’s started sending each other emails saying, ‘Hey, why don’t we try not to poach each other’s employees? It could keep salaries from going through the roof.’ Some, including Steve Jobs himself, would call that a gentleman’s agreement. The Department of Justice, however, calls it collusion, and now some of the biggest names in tech history are paying up.

Apple, Google, Intel and Adobe have agreed to settle a class action lawsuit for $324 million, Reuters is reporting. About 64,000 tech workers sought a combined $3 billion in damages, and while the settlement is technically a victory, it comes out to roughly $5,000 per employee — a far cry from the roughly $47,000 each that they wanted. Read More