Linkages

Booting Up: Tumblr’s Traffic Might Be Declining

eeeeeeesh (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Amazon is denying that it’s developing an “over-the-top” live streaming service for televisions. [The Verge]

The San Francisco Municipal Transportation Authority approved a pilot program last night that requires companies operating employee shuttles (cough Google and Facebook) to obtain permits and pay fees. [Recode]

The Internet is about to have its “big bang.” On Feb. 4, thousands of domain names, like .pizza, will be on sale. [Quartz]

Don’t freak out Marissa with this news, but Tumblr’s traffic is reportedly declining. [Forbes]

Uncarrier T-Mobile is launching Mobile Money, a low-cost bank account for people who are uncomfortable with traditional banks. Interestingly, users can access more than 4,000 ATMs for free. [CNet]

Linkages

Booting Up: Netflix Has 77,000 Sub-Categories So Why Does It Always Suggest The Office?

Soon. (Photo: Netflix)

Uber is distancing itself from an accident in San Francisco that killed a six-year-old. The company says the car wasn’t providing an Uber service during the incident so they’re not at fault. [PandoDaily]

Amazon is slowly putting on its boxing gloves against Netflix. It quietly rolled out its first ad for Prime Instant online video. [Recode]

Netflix has 77,000 sub-categories even though you’re just going to watch 30 Rock again. [Atlantic]

Apparently PlayStation 4 owners watch three times as much porno compared to their Xbox One counterparts. [BuzzFeed FWD]

CES is going to be flooded with celebrities like, uh, Olivia Munn. [AdWeek]

Linkages

Booting Up: Not To Brag, But Amazon Had Its ‘Best Ever’ Holiday

The gang! (Photo by Andrew Burton/Getty Images)

Google is expected to announce a partnership with Audi next week. The two companies will develop an Android-based in-car entertainment and information systems. [WSJ]

Everybody is cautiously excited about Twitter’s stock. This is partly the reason why: “Twitter’s total market value is one-third that of Facebook, which has five times as many users and more than 10 times the revenue.” [New York Times]

People are really liking the Google Chromebook. It accounted for a fifth of commercial laptops sold in November. [AllThingsD]

Amazon announced that on Cyber Monday it sold more than 426 items per second — or 37 million items sold on that one day alone. [BGR]

Shorter: CEO of Large Company Has a Packed Schedule. [New York Post]

Let's Go Shopping

Everybody Is Doing Their Holiday Shopping Online Because Malls Are Terrible

RIP mall. (Photo: Flickr)

Let’s be blunt: malls terrify us. There’s dealing with the parking, the hour-long wait at the Cheesecake Factory (no we’re not sitting at the bar like heathens) and don’t get us started with the teens circling around the Wok N Roll samples like vultures. And apparently, the rest of America is starting to realize that because more and more people are doing their holiday shopping online.

The Seattle Times reports that online retailers are, *cough,* cashing in as new data reveals that they’re growing more quickly than their brick-and-mortar competitors. According to retail analysts, holiday sales now account for 40 percent of shopping done online–almost double from 2012. Read More

Linkages

Booting Up: Twitter Is Sorry For Messing With The Block Function

See you soon, Frank! (Photo: YouTube)

Twitter changed how its block function worked. People hated it. Twitter changed it back. [Time]

Some enterprising Yahoo employees are going to Facebook and Google bus stops to recruit fresh meat. [Forbes]

It takes Netflix users a week to finish a 22-episode season of a show. [WSJ]

Amazon might launch a Costco club-like online store called Pantry next year. Shoppers can choose from 2,000 bulk items and have them delivered for a small fee. [USA Today]

[palms to the air emoji] Here’s a new trailer for House of Cards. [YouTube]

Fight! Fight! Fight!

eBay CEO Sassily Dismisses Amazon’s Drone Idea As ‘Fantasy’

Thinks Amazon is stupid. (Photo: Bloomberg)

Everyone is excited about Amazon’s improbable plan to deliver packages by drones, except for one person: eBay CEO John Donahoe.

Drinking a gallon of haterade before recently appearing on Bloomberg, Mr. Donahoe lambasted Team Bezos’s plan to replace some delivery drivers with the unmanned aerial vehicles as a “fantasy.” Emily Chang, a reporter at your dad’s favorite business network, asked him if eBay had any similar plans. He responded with a big, fat nope. Read More