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Molly Mulshine

game over

We Did It, America: Kim Kardashian’s App Might Pull in $200 Million

Just hanging out with Kim. (Photo via Kim Kardashian: Hollywood)

When we first broke the news that reality empress Kim Kardashian was working on a mobile game, we knew it would be popular — just not this popular.

Kim Kardashian: Hollywood (guess her native Calabasas doesn’t have as nice a ring to it) is now the second most-downloaded free-to-play game on the U.S. App Store, Bloomberg reports. And it’s on track to pull in $200 million in revenue in its first year. Read More

Horrible

Deranged Internet Commenter Apologizes For Falsely Accusing Conor Oberst of Rape

Non-rapist Conor Oberst. (Photo via Flickr)

It’s a good rule of thumb to avoid any online comments, especially if they appear in the notoriously batshit comments section of an xoJane article.

But when someone you don’t know falsely accuses you of raping her in, of all places, the comments section of an xoJane article, it’s probably pretty tough to ignore. This was the case in December 2013, when xoJane user Joanie Faircloth claimed that Bright Eyes frontman and emo hunk Conor Oberst raped her when she was just 16. The comments in question have since been deleted from the story on xoJane. Read More

Visiting Dignitaries

Solange Knowles Seems Weirdly Obsessed With Airbnb

Ms. Knowles earlier this month. (Photo via Getty)

Every once in a while, you discover a new technology that’s so awesome, so amazing, you just can’t stop talking about it. You start to sound like a commercial advertising the product, but you don’t care; you just have to spread the gospel of Minibar or Snapchat or that app that helps you get laid on a flight.

Right now, Solange Knowles is apparently going through that annoying phase, and her tech obsession du jour is troubled home-sharing startup Airbnb.  Read More

Just Genius

Today in WTF Rap Genius News: $40M Raised, a Kanye West Redesign and Mahbod Is Writing a Book

Rap Genius cofounders Tom Lehman, Ilan Zechory and Mahbod Moghadam.

When it comes to covering the tech industry, Rap Genius is the startup that keeps on giving. The average human can only take so many boring press releases about how a knockoff of Snapchat is going to change the world, you know?

But whenever the Rap Genius guys appear in public or sit for an interview, something bizarre happens. Today, for example, Business Insider broke the news that the annotation site has nabbed $40 million in funding from Ben Gilbert (as well as Ben Horowitz and Marc Andreessen, who is also an investor in BI) and that they’re changing their name to the catch-all Genius. Read More

New Drone City

Amazon Is Asking the FAA to Bend the Law for Their Drone Program

Delivery drones, coming soon to a suburban neighborhood near you. (Photo: YouTube)

When Jeff Bezos first announced his evil plan to start a drone delivery program for all the precious goods you order from Amazon, everyone was pretty sure it was either a publicity stunt, an April Fool’s joke or evidence that the billionaire had gone off his rocker.

But now, it appears Mr. Bezos and his ilk might actually be serious about getting the drone delivery program up and running. They’re at least serious enough to be taking time out of their busy schedule of possible-sex-toy-construction to ask the Federal Aviation Administration to bend the rules so that they can test drones on their own terms. Read More

Spotty Youths

These Teenage Tech Interns Are Probably Out-Earning You

She's pulling in a mill as we speak. (Photo via Getty)

The job market has improved slightly since a few years ago, when layoffs, panic and post-grad unemployment prevailed. That makes this a great time to sit back and analyze where the chips have fallen post-recession.

That is, until you read an article saying that high-school students are now being paid $7,000 per month plus benefits to intern at tech companies. That’s the equivalent of $84,000 per year. It’s also enough to make you want to fire your parents for allowing you to socialize and play sports as a child instead of learning how to code. Read More