App Economy

Over It: People Aren’t Downloading New Apps That Much

All we really care about is Instagram, tbh.
#NoNewApps. (Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

#NoNewApps. (Photo: STR/AFP/Getty Images)

New apps: who needs ‘em, amiright? Sure, it seems exciting at first to be able to order pizza or determine what a mannequin is wearing all from the comfort of your iPhone screen, but ultimately, don’t we all just want to check Facebook, Twitter, Snapchat and Instagram and be done with it?

A recent survey by Deloitte confirms that the average number of smartphone apps downloaded per month has been decreasing over the past year in the U.K., the Telegraph reports.

Thirty-one percent of people surveyed said they didn’t download any new apps in a typical month. That number has increased from 2013, when only around 20 percent of people went a month without downloading anything new. And when it comes to people who do download new apps (suckers), the average number of monthly downloads has fallen from 2.32 to 1.82 over the past year.

Additionally, nearly 90 percent of people say they never spend money on apps or in-app purchases, which is welcome news amidst reports of people stealing exorbitant amounts of money from their mothers to feed their Candy Crush addictions.

Sadly, the findings don’t necessarily indicate that everyone’s just sick and tired of apps already. Apparently, Deloitte’s results actually point to an increase in smartphone use amongst the over-50 population — people who just want to be able to call and text, and don’t give a hoot about all those “applications” the whippersnappers are downloading.

Of course, they also acknowledge the obvious — that once people download their preferred set of apps, they’re less likely to opt in for new ones.

“The more friends you have on one network, the less likely you are to move,” Deloitte’s Paul Lee is quoted as saying, “so inertia sets in and it becomes increasingly hard for a new player to come and dislodge the other player.”

We will, however, always be down to sample a new sexting app.

Follow Jordyn Taylor on Twitter or via RSS. jtaylor@observer.com