Facebook Faceplant

Facebook Adds Note To App Explaining That Messenger Isn’t Evil

This should do it.
The new app. (Photo: iTunes)

Not evil, they swear. (Photo: iTunes)

Facebook has a message to users complaining about its revamped Messenger app: Can u not?

Last month, Facebook stripped out the messaging function from its main app and forced users to download another app if they wanted to send and receive messages. Needless to say, people were peeved.

The app store was flooded with negative reviews and the changeover even prompted a piece in the New York Times about the app’s curious required permissions. Users were simmering that it required access to their phone’s camera, address book and microphone. That apparently prompted people to don their tin foil hats and claim that Facebook is spying on them.

With the outrage not dying down, Facebook is finally doing damage control. The Next Web noticed that some app users are seeing a prompt headlined “Messenger: Myths vs. Facts.” The sinister title almost sounds like a politician responding to an attack ad.

The “Learn More” button takes users to a post telling them that its permission settings are nothing to be scared of:

“Like most other apps, we request permission to run certain features, such as making calls and sending photos, videos or voice messages. If you want to send a selfie to a friend, the app needs permission to turn on your phone’s camera and capture that photo. We don’t turn on your camera or microphone when you aren’t using the app.”

So, shut it.

Follow Jordan Valinsky on Twitter or via RSS. jvalinsky@observer.com