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Computer Can Read Your Emotions With 87% Accuracy, Unlike Your Boyfriend

Who needs humans, amiright?
Your future boyfriend (maybe). (Wikimedia Commons)

Your future boyfriend (maybe). (Wikimedia Commons)

Sick of having to talk about ~feelings~ with your significant other? A new computer program developed by Bangladeshi researchers can reportedly detect users’ emotional states up to 87 percent of the time, depending on the emotion.

In order to read a user’s emotional state, the computer program analyzes two pieces of information: the user’s typing patterns, and the actual words and phrases they’re typing on the screen.

“This combined analysis gives us a promising result showing a substantial number of emotional states detected from user input,” the researchers wrote in Behaviour & Information Technology, the journal where their findings are published.

The results? The program could reportedly detect joy 87 percent of the time, anger 81 percent of the time, guilt 77 percent of the time, disgust 75 percent of the time, sadness 71 percent of the time, shame 69 percent of the time, and fear 67 percent of the time. It’s clearly not perfect, but we’re pretty sure it’s still more receptive than some humans, tbh.

The researchers believe their creation can help improve the way humans interact with computers (read: eliminate the need for interpersonal contact ever again).

“Computer systems that can detect user emotion,” they wrote, “can do a lot better than the present systems in gaming, online teaching, text processing, video and image processing, user authentication and so many other areas where user emotional state is crucial.”

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