Go Home Science You're Drunk

Kids Become Psychos When They Bite Chunks Out of Food, Science Says

But they're still less crazy than when you take away their Angry Birds.
Kids being k-k-kraaaazy (Wikimedia Commons)

Kids being k-k-kraaaazy (Wikimedia Commons)

Sometimes, when there’s nothing on TV and all its friends are busy, Science gets really bored and comes up with experiments like this: do kids act more aggressively when they bite chunks out of their food with their front teeth, or when their food is cut up?

Apparently, kids who use their teeth to tear off bites of food tend to behave twice as aggressively as those who eat food cut up with a knife and fork, the Daily Mail reports.

The study, conducted by Cornell University and published in Eating Behaviors, took place over two days at a 4-H summer camp. At lunchtime, the researchers split 12 kids aged six to ten into two groups — one with food that required biting, like whole apples and corn on the cob, and one with food that had been cut up. After lunch, the counselors asked the kids to stay inside a circle with a nine-foot radius.

They did the same thing the next day, except they swapped the two groups’ lunch offerings.

“Results from both the counsellors and coders’ observations indicated that when children were served chicken on the bone, they acted twice as aggressively and were twice as likely to disobey adults than when they were served bite-sized pieces of chicken,” the Daily Mail writes.

In other words, if you want to control your psychotic children, cut up their food. Though you’ll probably have to remind them how to use silverware, because apparently all kids can do these days is play with their damn iPads.

 

Follow Jordyn Taylor on Twitter or via RSS. jtaylor@observer.com