Kickstarter Failure

Biblical Video Game Producers Believe Satan Thwarted Their Kickstarter Project

"Look at the gospel accounts of demons and so forth. That’s reality."
(photo: Kickstarter)

(photo: Kickstarter)

When a fledgeling Christian video game company called Phoenix Interactive Studios wanted to bring the sacred stories of The Old Testament into our homes, they turned to Kickstarter for help. When that Kickstarter managed to raise less than ten percent of its $100,000 goal, who did they blame?

The powers of Hell, of course.

That’s right, the creators of the game unironically, 100 percent believe that Satan rallied his infernal forces to interfere with their sacred mission, they told Polygon.

“If Satan is rallying some of his resources to forestall, delay, or kill this project, I think, this must be a perceived threat to his kingdom,” Ken Frech, a religious mentor to the Kickstarter project, told Polygon. “I fully would expect something like this to have spiritual warfare. Look at the gospel accounts of demons and so forth. That’s reality. Many Americans don’t believe it anymore. That doesn’t change reality.”

The game would have allowed you to “follow Abraham as he is challenged to leave his homeland and trust in the promise that he will become the father of any nations,” and the project enlisted an advisory team of four pastors in order to assure an accurate portrayal.

It appears this is the first time Beelzebub, Lord of the Flies, has entered the world of crowdfunding.

“In my 25 years or so of interviewing game developers I have heard many complaints about malicious forces conspiring to confound a game’s launch,” said Colin Campbell, the reporter who first broke the story, “Generally, money and time are the culprits. This is the first time I have heard the Devil cited as an obstacle.”

Barring further interference from the Prince of Darkness, the game’s creators said they’ll be seeking alternative sources of funding.

The Father of Lies could not be reached for comment.

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