Survey Says

Study Reveals That Parents Have No Clue About Their Teens’ Driving Habits

Mom, shut up, you're ruining Morning Twitter.
Cool phone, bro. (Photo: Dagget Shuler Law)

Cool phone, bro. (Photo: Dagget Shuler Law)

Sneaky teens will say anything wiggle their way out of trouble, so obviously they’re going to lie about texting and driving to their parents. A new study released by Bridgestone quizzed 2,000 parents and teens about their driving habits and the discrepancies are a bit staggering.

More than half of teens said they texted while driving, even though 25 percent of stupidly parents thought they put their phones down. Another question pertained to how much socializing with other passengers is distracting teen drivers. 85 percent of teens admitted to doing that, while only 59 percent of parents weren’t oblivious enough to think their precious angels wouldn’t want to be social human beings.

Also, 40 percent of parents thought their kids yapped on the phone while driving, but 20 percent said they do. Most likely because they were Snapchatting, duh. Startlingly, 95 percent of kids said they check social media and email when they’re driving by themselves, but the figure stumbles to seven percent when there are parents in the vehicle.

The study’s author said that parents have no one but themselves to blame for these bad habits:

“Not only are teens engaging in these behaviors more than they know, teens are actually picking up these distracted driving behaviors from their parents,” according to Angela Patterson, the manager of the Teens Drive Smart Program at Bridgestone.

Those driverless cars can’t come fast enough.

Follow Jordan Valinsky on Twitter or via RSS. jvalinsky@observer.com