Sext and the City

Sorry, Not Sorry: Millennial Couples Simply Can’t Stop Sexting Each Other

Remember your sexts aren't ephemeral, children.
A sext? (Photo: Blogspot)

A sext? (Photo: Blogspot)

We’re about to string some terrible words together, so bare with us: millennial couples just can’t stop sexting each other.

The disturbing results come from a new survey that people who are in a serious relationship or co-habitating are the most frequent sexters — and they do it much more frequently than us singletons.

The survey surmises two plausible reasons for couples’ affection for sexting. One is that it’s a new way of spicing up their boring relations–or perhaps they’re engaging in suspicious activities and sexting other partners.However, single and married people don’t sext as frequently. “Single individuals had significantly stronger negative expectancies about sending and receiving sexts compared to others who were in some romantic relationship,” the survey found.

Furthermore, around 80 percent of 21-year-olds said they’ve received sexts and 67 percent (seems low?) admitted to sending one. Also, 50 percent of millennials have shared a nudey or semi-naked picture on their phone. Of the 611 people surveyed, men admitted to sexting more frequently compared to females.

Study author Allyson Dir said women are not as enthused by dick pics as men think they are. But she didn’t nail down why we love to sext:

“Much of our understanding about sexting comes from media and anecdotal reports about the dangers of sexting. Negative beliefs about sexting include the potential for legal ramifications the risk of sexts being shared with others and the resulting cyberbullying social humiliation, and psychological distress.”

Two words: Carlos Danger.

Follow Jordan Valinsky on Twitter or via RSS. jvalinsky@observer.com