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Congress Is a Little Worried About the Privacy Implications of Google Glass

"We are curious whether this new technology could infringe on the privacy of the average American."
Only models look this good in Glass. (Photo: Google)

Only models look this good in Glass. (Photo: Google)

The world is rapidly sorting itself into two camps: Glassholes, and people who want you to take that damn thing off your face. The latest concerned parties, according to the Wall Street Journal: the Congressional Bi-Partisan Privacy Caucus.

Imagine that: A bunch of politicians worried about a world where everyone wears a camera on his face, ready to snap a picture of any shenanigans by public figures.

Yesterday the group wrote an open letter to Larry Page, expressing their concerns:

“As members of the Congressional Bi-Partisan Privacy Caucus, we are curious whether this new technology could infringe on the privacy of the average American.”

So they’ve got just a few questions, like “how Google plans to prevent Google glass from unintentionally collecting data about the user/non-user without consent” and “what proactive steps is Google taking to protect the privacy of non-users when Google Glass is in use” (we assume it’s just a flyer suggesting you stay out of bathrooms with Robert Scoble). They’re also concerned about facial recognition technology.

Larry would never have to deal with this kind of question in his lawless disruptors’ Utopia.

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com