XXX in Tech

An Interview with the Anonymous Member Who Launched the Campaign Against Hunter Moore and Revenge Porn

"We don't tolerate invasions of personal privacy to victimize someone."
(Photo: Twitter)

(Photo: Twitter)

Last night, news broke that the hacktivist collective Anonymous had joined the fight against revenge porn by doxing Hunter Moore, the infamous proprietor of now-defunct revenge porn site Is Anyone Up.

In an interview with Betabeat, Mr. Moore said that his new site, HunterMoore.TV, would port over all of the old Is Anyone Up content, as well as include an address submission field so that naked photos were linked to a victim’s home address. “We’re going to introduce the mapping stuff so people are going to be able to stalk or do whatever they want to do–I know, it’s going to be scary as shit,” Mr. Moore said. “We’re just gonna add a new field and you can put their address in and then it will Google Map it.”

Mr. Moore has since retracted this statement, telling Salon that he will only be posting the addresses of those he hates, and not necessarily allowing users to submit addresses of their own. Still, his decision to further violate the privacy of those who appear on his new site caught the attention of Anonymous, which promptly launched #OpHuntHunter, a campaign focusing on holding Mr. Moore “accountable” for his revenge porn empire.

Betabeat spoke with @KYAnonymous, an Anonymous operative who, along with @jackherer20, launched #OpHuntHunter and posted a list of Mr. Moore’s personal information to Pastebin. KY Anonymous proved to Betabeat that he’s behind the video calling for the attack on Mr. Moore by inputting text into the description field at our request.

KY Anonymous told Betabeat that he decided to initiate the operation against revenge porn sites “because they destroy unsuspecting peoples lives, social lives, and work lives and take advantage of some kind of bond of trust they once entered with the person who submitted the photo.” He said that despite the fact that revenge porn has been around for awhile, he wanted to confront it now because Mr. Moore had decided to further use the Internet to violate people’s privacy. “huntermoore is enabling the sickos of the world to stalk and possibly rape, maim, or kill these people via tracking systems like gps, google maps, and we don’t tolerate invasions of personal privacy to victimize someone,” he wrote.

Likewise, much of Mr. Moore’s private information has been available online for a while now, but KY Anonymous argues that “a lot of info has been misleading or outdated,” and by pulling it all into an easy-to-read Pastebin file, anyone can “write letters, pay a visit (a taste of his own medicine) call, say hi to mom and dad, and even serve subpoenas.”

It seemed strange to us that Anonymous, which has been known to publish the personal information about its targets, would go after someone who is effectively guilty of the same thing. But KY Anonymous reasoned that Mr. Moore’s willingness to harm the blameless makes him a worthy target. “We wont stand by while someone uses the internet to victimize and capitilize off the misery of others,” KY Anonymous said. “We are all about free enterprise, but we are not about the things that Hunter Moore and other revenge porn sites are guilty of.”

KY Anonymous said “hundreds if not thousands” of hackers, programmers and “regular joes and janes” have joined the operation. So far, it’s unclear whether the operation has had much of an effect on Mr. Moore. HunterMoore.TV, which is said to be hosted internationally, is still up and running just fine, and does not appear to have fallen victim to any sort of DDOS attacks.

Follow Jessica Roy on Twitter or via RSS. jroy@observer.com