XXX in Tech

Hunter Moore’s ‘Scary as Shit’ Revenge Porn Site Will Map Submitted Photos to People’s Addresses

"All these people that thought they were safe: nah."
 Hunter Moores Scary as Shit Revenge Porn Site Will Map Submitted Photos to Peoples Addresses

Mr. Moore (Photo: ShowClix)

In an interview with Betabeat last night, infamous revenge porn peddler Hunter Moore shed some light on what his new smut submission site, HunterMoore.TV, will look like. Mr. Moore, who rose to prominence with the now-defunct revenge porn site IsAnyoneUp, intends to port all of the old content over from the original site onto the new one.

“I have nerds for days,” Mr. Moore, in New York to serve community service following a violent incident, told Betabeat last night in a Lower East Side bar. “I have nerds on nerds. I have so many secret servers. I got shit in Switzerland, Australia, Canada. All that stuff’s accessible, it’s just on a different domain.” He added that any content that had been legally questionable before will be gone.

“All these people that thought they were safe: nah, it’s all gonna be back,” he added.

Perhaps even more terrifying is the newest feature planned for HunterMoore.TV, which Mr. Moore said will launch anywhere from two weeks to a month from now. The submission form, which previously included fields like the person’s name, links to social media profiles and a place to upload photos, will have a new field: address. Scorned lovers who submit photos of their exes for revenge can now also enable others to physically stalk them by including their addresses along with the photos. HunterMoore.TV will then display the photos on a map.

The current submission form includes a “Where are they from?” field, but not a place to specify exact address. It also has many legal statements that users must check in order to submit, including, “By submitting this content you are agreeing to take full responsibility for the content you have submitted.”

Mr. Moore says he’s not liable for these sorts of privacy violations because it’s all user-submitted content. He reasons that he’s protected under Section 230 of the Communications Decency Act, which states that websites are immune from legal responsibility for content submitted by others.

But this mapping feature could be the fatal blow to Mr. Moore’s Section 230 defense. University of Maryland law professor and cyber-law expert Danielle Citron argues that by putting up the field for addresses, he could be facilitating stalking. “If he is putting up fields with someone’s address and a field ensuring that there’s a map to facilitate stalking, I think there’s an argument to be made that he is engaging in cyberstalking under federal criminal law,” Ms. Citron told Betabeat by phone. “Section 230 explicitly does not immunize federal criminal law violations.”

Mr. Moore seems unconcerned with the legalities associated with his newest venture.

“We’re gonna introduce the mapping stuff so you can stalk people,” Mr. Moore gleefully told Betabeat, adding, “I know–it’s scary as shit.”

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