Open Sesame

Angry Bonds? Bloomberg LP Lets Developers Play With Its Data

Because what trader wouldn't buy that app?

terminal Angry Bonds? Bloomberg LP Lets Developers Play With Its DataFinancial data just little (little) more fun, with Bloomberg LP announcing a new platform for third-party applications powered by the Bloomberg data and news.

There are already more than 45 apps available on the new platform, called the Bloomberg App Portal, including products for data analysis, portfolio management and risk analysis. The app portal can also be used to by Bloomberg clients to share proprietary tools with their own employees, according to a release.

The offering should help Bloomberg compete with Reuters and Markit, both of which have launched similar projects.

“I know a lot of people thought of us as sort of a closed system. Maybe this will make people look at us a bit differently,” Bloomberg co-founder Tom Secunda told The Financial Times, which reported that like Apple before it, Bloomberg will take a 30 percent cut of app store sales. Of course, unless you sit at a trading desk or design financial software, and maybe even then, what you really want to know is, will there be games? Not as far as we can tell, but here’s the next best thing:

With RiskVal’s Angry Bonds, view the most lucrative USD Treasury securities instantly. Our proprietary relative value analytics arm you with the Top 5 Bond trades of the day based on current levels against 3 Months of historical data on True ASW, OIS Spread, 2+ RVS, Yield Roll, and ASW Roll. Richest and cheapest trades are displayed in real-time by maturity or origin buckets so you can pick the securities with the most potential for your investment strategy.

Which Treasury bond has the cheapest ASW spread over the last 90 days? Which bond has the best 3-month Roll down in the entire Treasury curve? Getting actionable answers to these complex questions requires effort to set up and then maintain with each new bond announcement; Angry Bonds tells you what you need to know for a fraction of the cost of a standard system.

Sounds like fun!

Follow Patrick Clark on Twitter or via RSS. pclark@observer.com