Legalize It

‘Marijuana Majority’ Says Techies Have High Hopes With Dope

Well, if Peter Thiel says it's okay...
dustin Marijuana Majority Says Techies Have High Hopes With Dope

Definitely takes the cake for most soulful eyes among the Facebook cofounders.

TechCrunch points us to a delightful discovery: “Marijuana Majority,” a cunningly named campaign that attempts to convince the American public that tokers aren’t all lazy longhairs and shiftless teenagers and rakish rappers, thereby making it safe for average Joes to come out in favor of decriminalization. On the website, you’ll find a long list of prominent individuals of all stripes who’ve expressed some kind of support for legalizing it.

It comes complete with ready-t0-share image macros, which you can post to your Facebook wall like a little thinking-of-you card for the stoners in your life.

The names presented as witnesses for the defense are a varied assortment, ranging from Arianna Huffington (you didn’t really think she meant literal naps, did you?) to Pat Robertson to Morgan Freeman. As you’ll no doubt be shocked, shocked to learn, the list also includes an array of prominent techies, such as Facebook cofounder Dustin Moskovitz; Napster cofounder Sean Parker; and Paypal cofounder Peter Thiel.

TechCrunch asked the project’s founder why include the tech types alongside megastars like Rihanna and was told:

They’re influential, particularly to younger, web-connected people.  A lot of them aren’t shy about getting involved in policy debates and supporting organizations and initiatives that they agree with.

However, it’s worth noting that these folks don’t seem to be directly involved in the campaign. Rather, the organizers have aggregated celebs who’ve made statements of support for legalization, or contributed money to repeal efforts, or gotten caught burning one down in public. Clicking on their names brings up a citation for whatever source justifies their inclusion on the list–for instance, Mr. Parker qualifies by virtue of having once donated $100,000 to a 2010 California effort at legalization.

Makes sense, because we can’t imagine any other circumstance in which Pat Robertson and Bill Maher would find themselves on the same list, unless it’s a list of people you wouldn’t want to invite to a dinner party.

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com

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