Silicon Alley

Boston Wants Everyone to Know New York Startups Aren’t So Special, Okay

Boston boasts about its "much more balanced ecosystem."
 Boston Wants Everyone to Know New York Startups Arent So Special, Okay

“Fuck you, Boston’s most successful startup is AMERICA, okay?” — Paul Revere, probably.

This weekend, several outlets ran an AP story about New York’s startup scene, hitting all the high points–CornellNYC, the river of VC money, the local outposts of national companies like Google and Facebook. BostInno, however, has a quibble

New York is seeing huge activity in Internet and Mobile by CB Insights’ categorization. In other words, in software + internet. Boston/Massachusetts has a much more balanced ecosystem, with huge strength in healthcare and, until recently, in energy. And of course we have a growing robotics cluster as well.

Of course, as a Boston news outfit, the site decidedly has a dog in this particular fight. But while the spirit of good-natured rivalry between our fair cities inspires a knee-jerk tendency to reply “consumer Internet rules, biotech drools,” it’s a fair point. Partially because it’s so strong here and partially because they’re the most obvious to us as consumers, it’s easy to lapse into thinking that SoLoMo apps are the whole of technology, but it’s just not true.

That said, the VC funding number crunchers over at CB Insights (who don’t exactly shy away from pointing out New York’s weakness on everything that isn’t Internet and software) admitted in their most recent report that New York has been showing “signs of life” in healthcare and green energy. Witness, for example, the advent of the New York Genome Center, which aims to close the local biotech research gap. New York City has also lately been bolstering its robotics bona fides, and then there’s all the excitement around MakerBot and Shapeways. Oh, and let’s not forget how Armonk-based IBM wants to deploy Watson the AI to save your life.

All that, and we even have a good ten minutes more of daylight in the winter.

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com