Privacy Police

Feds Claim They Don’t Need a Probable-Cause Warrant to Track You via Your Cell Signal

They know what you did last night (got ice cream at the bodega then fell asleep early).
 Feds Claim They Dont Need a Probable Cause Warrant to Track You via Your Cell Signal

(Photo: FCC)

If you were somehow tricked into thinking you still had any semblance of privacy in our great nation, please think again. Wired reports that the federal government has stated that you have “no reasonable expectation of privacy” when it comes to location data transmitted by your cell phone, thus giving them the right to review your location history without a warrant.

That’s the argument the government is making in a re-trial about a drug dealer after the Supreme Court ruled that its use of GPS tracking on the defendant constituted an illegal search.

Writes Wired:

The Obama administration told a federal court Tuesday that the public has no “reasonable expectation of privacy” in cellphone location data, and hence the authorities may obtain documents detailing a person’s movements from wireless carriers without a probable-cause warrant.

The administration, citing a 1976 Supreme Court precedent, said such data, like banking records, are “third-party records,” meaning customers have no right to keep it private.

Burner cells–even if they are shitty flip phones–are starting to look pretty good right about now, and we’re not even tin foil hat enthusiasts.

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