The Russians

Hey Billionaires: Don’t You Want to Live Forever? Then Invest Now!

Like crowdfunding for people bored of buying mega-yachts.
screen shot 2012 07 19 at 2 03 24 pm Hey Billionaires: Dont You Want to Live Forever? Then Invest Now!

Sure, okay.

Ladies and gentlemen of the monied class, have we got a deal for you! Russian entrepreneur Dmitry Itskov wants to present you with the option of living forever, your consciousness ported over to an indestructible robot body.

Popular Science points us to this pitch letter, which is addressed to what is likely Mr. Itskov’s only market segment: the “Honorable Members of Forbes World’s Billionaires List.”

First, he does a bit of lifestyle shaming:

You have worked hard to achieve amazing results, and often even compromising your health, your longevity.

However, he bears good news!

But it no longer has to be this way.

Unfortunately, the technology doesn’t exactly exist yet. And so, like an unusually high-concept Kickstarter project, Mr. Itskov needs your investment in order to bring this product to market, as it were:

Currently you invest in business projects that will bring you yet another billion. You also have  the ability to finance the extension of your own life up to immortality. Our civilization has come very close to the creation of such technologies: it’s not a science fiction fantasy. It is in your power to make sure that this goal will be achieved in your lifetime.

However, he understands your reservations and is ready to remedy them:

For anyone interested, but skeptical, I am ready to prove the viability of the concept of cybernetic immortality by arranging an expert discussion with a team of the world’s leading scientist working in this field.

He also offers to “coordinate your personal immortality project entirely free of charge for the sake of speeding up the development of these technologies.”

You know what this means, right? It means that Mark Zuckerberg could very well be the CEO of Facebook literally forever. 

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com