XX in Tech

Bad News, Bros: Woman Are the Tech Demo That Matters

Call your mom. Maybe ask her a couple of questions.
3437092743 7222579f56 Bad News, Bros: Woman Are the Tech Demo That Matters

This girl is your future demo. (flickr.com/littledebbie11)

Just because wisdom is conventional doesn’t mean it’s right, and just because dudes 18 to 25 are considered the prized tech demographic doesn’t mean it’s true. The Atlantic dug up a recent talk by Intel researcher Genevieve Bell, and it turns out that women are pretty much the customers you want to have on lock. And people wonder why Pinterest has a great big Scrooge McDuck-style cache of venture capital cash.

Ms. Bell has shared several interesting nuggets, including that women in Western countries use the Internet 17 percent more per month; they spend more time talking on their mobile phones (hold your stereotyped jokes, please); and they’re the biggest users of every social networking site that’s not LinkedIn. Also, “Women are the vast majority owners of all internet enabled devices–readers, healthcare devices, GPS.”

This shouldn’t be surprising if you consider who rules the roost at home:

Furthermore, most consumers don’t own devices just by themselves, those devices exist within social networks. Consumers share devices in families, so that a mobile phone is owned by multiple people, a laptop is used by multiple people, an email account is used by multiple people.

Speaking of your mom, maybe you should just use her as a one-woman focus group. Says Bell (via The Atlantic):

So it turns out if you want to find out what the future looks like, you should be asking women. And just before you think that means you should be asking 18-year-old women, it actually turns out the majority of technology users are women in their 40s, 50s and 60s. So if you wanted to know what the future looks like, those turn out to be the heaviest users of the most successful and most popular technologies on the planet as we speak.

Gee, we can’t imagine why companies still pull ridiculous, sexist stunts.

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com