Wearable Tech

Google Hoping You’ll Freefall for Project Glass Stunt

Computer glasses are cool, guys, we swear!

picture 53 Google Hoping Youll Freefall for Project Glass StuntAt today’s Google I/O developers conference, Google cofounder Sergey Brin decided the best way to demo Project Glass, the augmented reality glasses we’ve been jonesing for since their introduction, was to throw people out of a plane. Seriously!

In a strangely Michael Bay-style demo, skydivers donned Google Glasses, jumped out of a plane and parachuted onto the roof of the Moscone Center, where the conference is taking place. Meanwhile, somewhere in heaven, Steve Jobs clenched his hand into a fist and shook it in the air, screaming, “Briiiiiin!!!!!!!”

Oh, but the skydivers aren’t all. After they landed (without a hitch) on the roof, BMX bikers–a subset of the population we have not thought of since the 8th grade–did fancy tricks on ramps and stuff. Then more crazy people rappelled down the side of the Moscone Center, and then more bikers almost hit I/O attendees in their rush to ride their bikes through the lobby and into the conference. It was basically nuts. (“Doubt I’ll buy Google’s tablet, but if they release that Google Glass demo on DVD, I’ll take five,” tweeted Business Insider reporter Seth Fiegerman.)

The whole event was entirely enthralling, but also struck us as a painfully obvious attempt to legitimize Google Glasses as totally rad and not just for nerds, bro! Athletic people can wear Google Glasses! People who dress entirely in Volcom clothing can wear Google Glasses! As of yet, Google does not have a partnership with RayBan or Warby Parker, but we’re totally positive cool dudes would be totally into Google Glasses.

But in the end, it’s always the nerds who inherit the earth–or at least the eyewear. Mr. Brin announced at the end of the presentation that U.S.-based developers in attendance at the I/O conference can purchase a pair of non-consumer ready glasses to experiment with for $1,500. As our editor put it, “That’s pretty affordable for technology from 3012.”

Follow Jessica Roy on Twitter or via RSS. jroy@observer.com