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Apple-Loving Indonesia Is Very Sad to be Passed Over in the Asia iTunes Debut

That wasn't very nice, Apple.
 Apple Loving Indonesia Is Very Sad to be Passed Over in the Asia iTunes Debut

What do they have to do, Apple?! (Photo: flickr.com/mac_ivan

Earlier this week, Apple rolled iTunes out to 12 Asian nations, including Singapore (Eduardo Saverin, sans Snoop Dogg singles no more), Vietnam and Cambodia. However, several big countries did not receive invitations to the iTunes par-tay, including both China and India. Understandable, since adding a couple billion new users is probably something of a logistical challenge.

But of those that were left out, it’s Apple-crazed Indonedia that’s the most devastated by this insensitive act of neglect, reports the Wall Street Journal, resulting in widespread “disappointment and confusion.”

What must Indonesia do to prove its love, Apple? Fans have:

proved their loyalty to the company by waiting months after product launches to get their hands on devices such as the iPhone 4S, which was first released last October but didn’t arrive in Indonesia until late January, since Apple typically releases its products later there.

If that’s not enough:

Many Indonesians also pay a high premium for new Apple products like the iPhone 4S, which has sold for up to $1100 locally despite a retail price of $850 for an unlocked, contract-free version of the top model in the U.S.

That sure sounds like loyalty to us. We’re not paying more than a grand for anything less than Google Glasses, and we’re only shelling out then if they throw in some skydiving lessons.

Even worse:

Adding salt to their wounds, some Indonesians said, is that even smaller economies such as Cambodia, Laos and Vietnam made the list with new versions of iTunes, though two other giant markets – China and India – were left out along with Indonesia.

One Indonesian tech blogger told the Journal that, “It really makes sense for Apple to be here” and that, “All the fanboys are hugely disappointed.”

Ladybeat respects their right to feel their feelings, but isn’t regular disappointment just built into the fanboy lifestyle?

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com