Why God Why

Sorry, Folks, New York’s Internet Won’t Be Fixed Any Time Soon

The plan is a little unclear.
5306076207 92e0fdc095 Sorry, Folks, New York’s Internet Wont Be Fixed Any Time Soon

Move across that bridge and we can't promise Internet. (flickr.com/ugod)

It’s no secret that New York City’s high-speed Internet situation is not always what it could be. The Center for an Urban Future’s report on the city’s tech sector called out this problem specifically, rating the local infrastructure as “B or B-minus” and adding that areas further-flung than midtown and downtown Manhattan are especially problematic. Nor is this news to anyone in Silicon Alley, where spotty broadband is a source of much wailing and gnashing of teeth.

So, how long must we labor under these conditions? The Village Voice did a little digging, and the outlook is not so great:

Telecommunications (DoITT), said that an agreement between New York and internet service providers inked in August would address connectivity concerns, but did confirm that the exact steps for how to address them — and measure success — had not been fully enacted.

Check it out. As part of that deal, Time Warner Cable is supposed to invest $1.2 million per year and Cablevision must pony up $600,000 yearly to bring fiber into un-served commercial buildings. For Time Warner, this includes laying 20 miles of cable per year on commercial blocks and wiring the Brooklyn Navy Yard. This agreement runs until July 2020.

But, as the Voice also points out: “And because the service areas of both these companies don’t much overlap, it’s unclear how this would address a lack of broadband backup.”

So, basically better broadband is TBD.

Follow Kelly Faircloth on Twitter or via RSS. kfaircloth@observer.com