Kickstarted

This Touchscreen Watch, Pebble, Hit $2 M. Faster Than Any Other Kickstarter Project

Apparently you people really like wrist candy.

It’s a simple idea, but one that takes true technological sophistication to build: what if all of the important things your cell phone can do could be transferred over to a watch via Bluetooth? The concept has that futuristic Google Glasses waft to it, but it’s a product that is real and actually works, and eager technophiles are all but throwing money at the team who invented it.

Pebble, an e-paper watch for iPhone and Android, is “infinitely customizable, with beautiful downloadable watchfaces and useful internet-connected apps. Pebble connects to iPhone and Android smartphones using Bluetooth, alerting you with a silent vibration to incoming calls, emails and messages.”

Umm–awesome.

Apparently the entire Internet thought so, too, as the project–which still has 35 days left to go–has been funded a stunning 20 times over. It has over $2 million pledged, an amount well over the team’s $100,000 goal. To date, 14,428 people have backed the project in hopes of scoring a sleek little wrist doodad of their very own.

The Pebble does resemble a previous record-breaking Kickstarter project for a watch that used an iPod Nano as the timepiece. The difference is that the Pebble’s screen is made of e-paper, and is compatible with both iPhone and Android devices.

Today’s Top Thing claims that the Pebble is the fastest growing and most successful Kickstarter project to date.┬áJustin Kazmark, a spokesperson for Kickstarter, told Betabeat, “I can confirm Pebble is the fastest project to hit $2 million.” When we asked if it was the fastest growing Kickstarter project ever, Mr. Kazmark said that it depends on how you measure it–one project reached $1 million slightly quicker than the Pebble, but the Pebble reached $2 million faster than any other project.

Hopefully the Pebble team can follow through on the thousands of people who now expect a watch from them. Hey, at least we don’t have any dead jellyfish to worry about with this one.

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