All Your Link Bait Is Belong to Us

Parse.ly Launches Dash, Analytics with a Scalpel

Publishers rejoice in anticipation.

huffpo Parse.ly Launches Dash, Analytics with a ScalpelAnalytics startup Parse.ly, a graduate of DreamIt Ventures and New York City-based startup, just announced a new product, here by popular demand. Dash is a tool that lets publishers more finely follow the performance of their own content (and individual authors) as well as track trending and flagging topics across the web. These are the kinds of tools and tricks being developed in-house at media (tech?) companies like Gawker, BuzzFeed and Huffington Post; now we can all take our writing assignments from the machines.

Specifically, editors at separate organizations asked us the same question: Can you share some of that data with us? You know, the topic data and the data on authors? Begrudgingly, we agreed, and started to send out reports on a monthly basis.

Editors: “Hmm, this is great! Can we get this quicker?”
Parse.ly: “Uh, sure. We can give it to you weekly.”
Editors: “Awesome! Actually, it’d be great if we could get this daily.”
Parse.ly: “OK, what’s up here? Why do you care more about the data than the recommendations?”

Well, as it turns out, nobody had really showed them this data before, and the data was simply eye-opening for the editorial team. They were using it to go beyond monitoring individual articles to understanding what was resonating with their audience.

Parse.ly has raise about $1.8 million from DreamIt, ff Venture Capital and Blumberg Capital, according to CrunchBase. Parse.ly’s original product, an intelligent news reader, has fallen by the wayside: the product tour on Parse.ly’s site is all about Dash (a fitting name for the fitness-loving company). Will Parse.ly Reader continue to exist? “No, not in its current state,” CEO Sachin Kamdar told Betabeat via Twttr. “There are great companies taking its spot. See @gotrapit or @sitesimon.”

ReadWriteWeb says the new tool will force publishers to eat their vegetables; but it seems more like it will force everyone to eat their sweets.

 

 

Follow Adrianne Jeffries on Twitter or via RSS. ajeffries@observer.com