SOPA Opera

GoDaddy: We Really Definitely Oppose SOPA Now, You Can Switch Your Domains Back

godaddy danica GoDaddy: We Really Definitely Oppose SOPA Now, You Can Switch Your Domains BackIn the last week, GoDaddy has rescinded its support for the Stop Online Piracy Act, announced its opposition to the bill’s Senate companion Protect IP Act, and had itself taken off Congress’s list of SOPA supporters. “We have observed a spike in domain name transfers, which are running above normal rates and which we attribute to GoDaddy’s prior support for SOPA, which was reversed,” CEO Warrn Adelman said in a statement released yesterday. “GoDaddy opposes SOPA because the legislation has not fulfilled its basic requirement to build a consensus among stake-holders in the technology and Internet communities. Our company regrets the loss of any of our customers, who remain our highest priority, and we hope to repair those relationships and win back their business over time.”

GoDaddy was also accused of delaying some of the domain transfers in the wake of the SOPA debacle.

As we’ve seen with hapless Wisconsin rep Paul Ryan, whose mere lack of opposition to SOPA was enough to put him in anti-SOPA advocates’ sights, civically-inclined citizens of the internet are not satisfied with a “do not support.” The bill, which would allow for government intervention if a website is hosting copyrighted content, even if that content comes from users, has been the cause of much handwringing. Internet users see it as a case of big media and Hollywood co-opting Congresspeople who then immediately reveal their utter ignorance of how the internet works during Congressional testimony.

An amendment introduced earlier this month stipulated that the bill only applies to foreign websites.┬áThe bill also provides immunity for financial institutions and online ad networks. According to the Judiciary Committee, the bill has strong support. SOPA’s supporters including committee chairman Lamar Smith (R-Texas) have been pushing their message hard in response to accusations that the bill would “break the internet,” saying critics’ claims are unfounded or “lies.”

The vote will be scheduled in early January.

Follow Adrianne Jeffries on Twitter or via RSS. ajeffries@observer.com

Comments

  1. Neosaigo says:

    It is not so much government intervention, SOPA and PIPA actually puts the power to take down websites to the corporations.

    Which means it is possible for them to control the internet if they find some sites to be detrimental to their profit motives, and that is an actual slippery slope since many things threatens profit motives in the free market.